Baby

Retailer will take old baby seat in exchange for discount on new one

FILE – 4moms products on display during the 4moms Car Seat launch event at Petersen Automotive Museum on Aug. 4, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.

Calling all parents: Target is holding a baby car seat trade-in event through April 17.

The retail chain will allow customers to trade in an older car seat in exchange for 20% off of a “new car seat, car seat base, travel system, stroller or select baby home gear. Select baby home gear includes playards, high chairs, swings, rockers & bouncers,” according to the store’s website.

Trade-ins will be allowed for the following items:

  • Infant car seats
  • Convertible car seats
  • Car seat bases
  • Harness or booster car seats
  • Car seats that are expired or damaged

Qualified items can only be traded in at Target store locations. Designated signage will point guests to drop-off boxes which will be located near guest services inside all stores.

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The 8 Best Baby Bike Seats of 2021

A quick look at the best baby bike seats:

If you cycle for fun or to commute and bring your baby along for the ride, you’ll need a baby bike seat to do the job as safely as possible. But with such a wide variety of bike seats on the market today, it’s important to do your research carefully, just as you would while researching other products for your baby.

Like any physical activity that you participate in with your baby strapped in, biking comes with its risks.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advises parents to be especially careful of instability factors that can occur when a young passenger is strapped onto an adult bike. They also recommend that only children older than 12 months of age sit in a rear bike seat or be carried on a bicycle of any kind.

The AAP also recommends that adults use

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Bugatti Baby II Plays with the Past

From Car and Driver

The sight of a scaled-down Bugatti Type 35 being driven by an obviously 1:1 scale adult male is likely to set you thinking of an oversized toy. But this would be wrong, at least according to the European Union. “According to the EU, it’s too fast to be classified as a toy,” said Ben Hedley, CEO of the Little Car Company that has created this three-quarter-scale electric Bugatti and will soon be launching other shrunken classics. Having experienced the breezy charms of the Baby II’s open cockpit and 43-mph top speed, I can attest that it’s anything but childish.

As its numerical suffix suggests, the Baby II isn’t the first time that Bugatti has created a miniature. Back in 1926, Bugatti founder’s Ettore and his oldest son, Jean, created a half-scale Type 35 for Ettore’s son Roland’s fourth birthday. Powered by an electric motor, it had

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