Chip

Chip shortage means vehicle inventory likely won’t recover until 2023

A world-wide shortage of microchips has forced automakers to slow or stop production of many cars. That has pushed car prices to record highs in both the new and used markets. Analysts have consistently predicted that the problem would ease in 2022. But now, a major chip maker is warning that it could last into 2023.

Backlog will take more than a year to clear

Japan’s Rohm Co.
ROHCY,
+3.41%
is one of the largest suppliers of microchips to the automotive industry. Its largest clients include Toyota
TM,
+1.72%,
Ford
F,
-0.92%,
and Honda
HMC,
+1.18%.

“All of our production facilities have been running at their full capacity since September last year, but orders from customers are overwhelming,” Rohm CEO Isao Matsumoto told reporters in August. “I don’t think we can fulfill all the backlog of orders next year.”

Why this happened

The average new car contains

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VW, Ford, Daimler fear chip shortage could persist for some time

Technicians work in the assembly line of German carmaker Volkswagen’s electric ID. 3 car in Dresden, Germany, June 8, 2021.

Matthias Rietschel | Reuters

Car manufacturers including Ford, Volkswagen and Daimler are still struggling to deal with the impact of the global chip shortage, with executives from each of the companies warning a lack of silicon is likely to remain a problem.

Volkswagen CEO Herbert Diess, Daimler CEO Ola Kallenius and Ford Europe chairman of the management board Gunnar Herrmann told CNBC’s Annette Weisbach at the Munich Motor Show on Monday that it’s hard to tell when the complex issue will be resolved.

Germany’s Volkswagen, Europe’s largest carmaker, has lost market share in China as a result of the chip shortage, Diess said.

“We are relatively weak because of semiconductor shortages,” he said. “We are hit more in China than the rest of the world. That’s why we are

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INDIANA IN-DEPTH: Chip shortage puts news, used vehicles in high demand | Across Indiana

Currently in the market for a new or used car? If so, be prepared for some sticker shock, at least for the foreseeable future.

According to the analysts at automotive resource company Edmunds, new car inventories have been strained for months due primarily to a combination of global semiconductor chip shortages and supply chain disruptions connected to the COVID-19 pandemic.

After digging into the potential impacts of those factors, the company recently reported that new vehicle inventory at dealerships nationwide was down by 48% this spring compared to a year ago, with inventories continuing to fall in the summer. And while the company does predict that new car inventories will begin to steadily rebuild beginning in September, the anticipation is that inventories will remain well below their pre-pandemic levels through 2022.

“New vehicles — particularly new trucks and SUVs — are basically the 2021 equivalent of toilet paper and

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UK car production in July at lowest level since 1956 amid ‘pingdemic’ and chip shortage

Potential customer walks around Charles Hurst Usedirect used car dealership on Boucher Road in Belfast as restrictions in Northern Ireland ease allowing new and used cars sales.

In July production for the UK market declined -38.7% to 8,233 while manufacturing for export also fell, down -37.4% with 45,205 cars shipped overseas. Photo: PA

UK car manufacturing declined to the lowest level since 1956 in July, down 37.6% due to global chip shortages and the ‘pingdemic’ slowing down production.

The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) said some manufacturers had changed their summer shutdown timings to manage the rout. 

In July production for the UK market declined -38.7% to 8,233 while manufacturing for export also fell — down -37.4% with 45,205 cars shipped overseas. 

“These figures lay bare the extremely tough conditions UK car manufacturers continue to face,” said Mike Hawes, SMMT CEO.

Chart: SMMT

Chart: SMMT

Exports accounted for more than eight out of 10 (84.6%) vehicles built in the month as buyers around the world continued to be attracted to the wide range of high-quality cars made

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