engine

That Time Subaru Built a Flat 12-Cylinder Engine for F1 Racing

Subaru’s racing efforts are renowned by enthusiasts far and wide, as the underdog Japanese brand scored legions of fans—and championships—during the 1990s and 2000s as one of the dominant players in World Rally Championship (WRC) competition. (Its wide lineup in the Gran Turismo PlayStation game series didn’t hurt, either.) In short order, four-wheel drifting glory became a key part of its identity, fostering tons of press and boosting global sales of the company’s all-wheel-drive turbo sedans and wagons.

Far less ink has been spilled about the automaker’s less successful bid to shine in the context of a different motorsports institution. In fact, well before rally ever entered the picture, Subaru was determined to highlight its engineering prowess and turn the heads of enthusiasts who had largely written off the quirky brand—by cracking the ranks of Formula 1.

To get started, all it needed was an engine. Unfortunately, that powerplant turned

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Ford hints at a high-performance version of its 7.3-liter Godzilla crate engine

Much of the automotive industry is focusing on downsizing its engines for better fuel economy and packaging. However, Ford is flying in the face of that idea with the 7.3-liter truck engine that it’s fitted to the current Super Duty trucks.

The engine — nicknamed Godzilla — is also available from Ford Performance as a crate engine. This is exciting for performance enthusiasts for several reasons, but the Godzilla is still a standard truck engine at the end of the day. Ford’s working on something that could change that, and it’s called Megazilla, according to a video published by Performance Racing Industry in November.

Ford isn’t giving up any details on the Megazilla project, but based on what we know about the standard version, we can guess

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Car industry no longer growth engine of German economy

Germany’s mighty car industry, which has been hit particularly hard by the coronavirus pandemic, is no longer the engine driving the country’s economy.

“For the first time in a decade, the auto industry is facing noticeable personnel adjustments and will initially fail as a growth engine for Germany,” says a new study by the German Economic Institute (IW), reported exclusively by Handelsblatt.

The results of the IW study are likely to hang over the meeting on Tuesday this week between the German government and the heads of the countries powerful car companies and automotive suppliers.

Already before the global COVID-19 pandemic hit, the automotive industry was struggling with overcapacity, as well as the need to invest billions to switch to electrification, and get their fleet emissions down in the face of tough new EU emissions standards.  

READ MORE: German car industry warns of job losses due to ‘unprecedented slump’

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