Ferrari

The Only Road Legal GT40 Stunt Car From “Ford V Ferrari” Is for Sale

Ford V Ferrari was a cinematic blockbuster that set out to tell the abridged tale of how an American car company took the fight to Ferrari in Europe, and came out the victor. Featuring big names like Matt Damon and Christian Bale, the automotive star of the show is the Ford GT40, the racecar that took Ford to four Le Mans victories in the 1960s. Obviously, the production needed a few stunt cars to shoot the film, and now, one of those very replica GT40s will be sold at the upcoming Mecum Auctions in Dallas this September.



a car parked in a parking lot: Ford V Ferrari was a cinematic blockbuster that set out to tell the abridged tale of how an American car company took the fight to Ferrari in Europe, and came out the victor. Featuring big names like Matt Damon and Christian Bale, the automotive star of the show is the Ford GT40, the racecar that […]


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Ford V Ferrari was a cinematic blockbuster that set out to tell the abridged tale of how an American car company took the fight to Ferrari in Europe, and came out the victor. Featuring big names like Matt Damon and Christian Bale, the automotive star of the

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Ferrari Enters Luxury Fashion, Targeting Uninitiated Youth

Maranello, Italy (AP) — Ferrari V12 production cars were suspended over the factory floor Sunday night as the 74-year-old luxury carmaker launched a new era as a lifestyles brand, with a runway show unveiling its first ready-to-wear collection targeting a younger generation that might not be aware of its Formula One racing pedigree and coveted performance street cars.

Models walked along the halted production line in a symbolic gesture that underlined the creative interplay between Ferrari’s long lineage of sleek, curved automotive bodies and the fashion line by creative director Rocco Iannone, strong on structured outwear contrasting with fluid, bright printed silks in Ferrari red, Scuderia yellow and electric blue.

Iannone’s collection could easily have narrowly targeted Ferrari’s already loyal customer base — mostly more mature consumers who fill waiting lists for the nearly 10,000 annual production of luxury cars that start around $200,000 — with more staid driving clothes

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Ferrari Hits a Bump – WSJ

Ferrari investors may have gotten too used to smooth driving.

The luxury sports-car maker isn’t pulling away from the challenges posed by the pandemic quite as effortlessly as some were hoping. Its shares fell 7% in New York Tuesday after the company said it would hit its 2022 financial targets a year late due to Covid-19. Ferrari delayed some spending last year; now it has worked through its delivery schedule enough to expect a knock-on impact on profits next year.

The selloff highlights just how high the stakes are when a stock fetches more than 40 times prospective earnings. If investors are spooked by some relatively minor post-pandemic grinding of gears, they may not be properly prepared for Ferrari’s move into the electric age—a process fraught with much greater risks for a brand based on engine noise.

Chairman John Elkann said last month that Ferrari would launch its first

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Why This Unrestored 1955 Ferrari Could Fetch a Bonkers $2.6 Million at Auction

The allure of unrestored cars has grown over the past couple of decades, with “survivor” vehicles now featured in their own classes at the most prestigious concours events worldwide. The most coveted of these survivors are so-called barn finds—cars sequestered in a dusty garage, shuttered warehouse or even a chicken coup, only to be disinterred decades later. Visions of Howard Carter opening King Tut’s tomb come to mind, and these modern-day automotive discoveries reveal their own amazing secrets.

This 1955 Ferrari 250 Europa GT, offered by Gooding & Company, is an exciting example of a car likely to be worth as much or more in its original condition than if it were a pristine, restored example. That this Prancing Horse has been in a state of suspended animation for 55 years makes it a precious research tool for collectors, historians and restorers. Gooding & Company estimates it will bring

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