Day: February 22, 2021

Gordon Murray Automotive T50s Niki Lauda honors 2 kinds of F1 greats

Such a refreshing look for a track car.


Gordon Murray Automotive

If you name your car after Formula One great Niki Lauda, it better be good. Thankfully, if there’s any company likely worthy of building such a car, it’s Gordon Murray Automotive, the company responsible for bringing the McLaren F1-inspired T50 to life. Without further ado, this is the GMA T50s Niki Lauda, meant to be the be-all and end-all for a track car.

GMA and its man in charge, Professor Gordon Murray — yes, that Murray from the iconic McLaren F1 program — revealed the T50s Niki Lauda on Monday, which also happens to be the late Lauda’s birthday. He would have been 72 years old. The T50s is a fitting tribute to the F1 legend, but unlike Murray’s work on the McLaren F1 and F1 GTR programs, where the latter was based on the former, the T50s

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Automotive Glass Market Gain Impetus due to the Growing Demand over 2020-2030

Future Market Insights has announced the addition of the “2020 Analysis and Review: Automotive Glass Market by Glass Type – Laminated Glass and Tempered Glass for 2020 – 2030” report to their offering.

The  automotive glass market  is likely to surpass US$ 16.8 billion through 2030, according to a new research study by Future Market Insights.

According to the study, high strength and lower price structure drives the adoption rate of the automotive glass but inadequate standardization continue to hinder the market growth prospects.

Car companies are incorporating glass canopies while also fuelling the use of automotive glass in rear view mirrors and electronic sensors,” says the FMI Analyst.

To Get Sample Copy of Report Visit @ https://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/sample/rep-gb-2262

Automotive Glass Market – Key Highlights

Tempered automotive glass accounts for 65% of revenue share.
Electric section will remain lucrative in the automotive glass market during the assessment period.
East Asia

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Big Automotive Chip Shortage Is No Surprise

“Car Makers Collide With Global Chip Shortage” (Page One, Feb. 13) correctly identifies the auto industry’s current supply-chain woes as a self-inflicted wound. From the electronics-manufacturing industry’s point of view, automotive is mostly a low-volume, high-mix customer segment, and it requires buffering through component distributors. Instead, the auto makers’ extreme focus on cost optimization and lean manufacturing meant eliminating these valuable supply-chain partners. The focus on lean should have been balanced with a pragmatic view on the extreme cost of idled automotive production lines. To shut down production lines for $80,000 vehicles because of a missing $2 microcontroller is catastrophic.

Products like semiconductors that have longer lead times and large production lot sizes need distribution for efficient buffering between the manufacturers and end customers. Semiconductors have extremely long and complex production cycles that can range from 10 to 26 weeks. Once a production cycle

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